Writing about nonfiction texts with text

While the student may look at this as simply a means to an end, that end being writing a research paper, this is actually teaching them to think critically and analytically. The ability to read and understand nonfiction will allow them to begin to form their own thoughts based on a myriad of sources.

Writing about nonfiction texts with text

October 30, December 20, Looking for a memorable way to teach students to summarize nonfiction texts? Try this alternative strategy in your secondary classroom as a means of differentiation or scaffolding for struggling readers.

Have you ever noticed how easy it is to teach students to summarize fictional texts? They seem to catch on so quickly! If only nonfiction was equally as straightforward!

Here are a few tips to simplify your summarizing instruction when it comes to nonfiction, non-narrative texts: Start by picking high-interest texts.

Create a List

Curriculet and Newsela are great online resources. Begin with direct instruction. While people possess differing opinions on the value of direct instruction, I have seen its benefit when introducing new information.

Keep it short, but give an overview of the down and dirty tips you expect your peeps to remember. Make them take notes. Model, model, and then model like Cindy Crawford. Students need to see you working your mojo.

Select a short text. Read it or watch it together students love visual texts. Then, do a think-aloud while you model some brainstorming and writing up on the board. Students generally want to get involved in this process. If you are uncomfortable with writing on your feet, prepare something in advance and act like you are doing it on the spot.

Direct instruction — guided practice — independent practice. This is just common sense. After you model, practice as many times as you deem necessary with the class. Write a summary together, put them in small groups, let them complete a think-pair-share summary for a different text, and then finally, throw those baby birds out of the nest and see if they fly or splat on the ground.

As with any effectively taught lesson, students need breaks. I try to chunk my instruction into three different parts in a forty-five minute period. Even having students get up and grab a piece of paper from across the room helps get their blood flowing, increases their energy levels, and improves their focus.

What does this look like with summarizing?

Active Reading

Maybe read a text, then have them discuss it with a partner or small group. Following, they could get up and grab the graphic organizer from across the room.

You might end the period with a whole-class discussion about what to include in the written summary. Students can stand to share their ideas. Still, I like to do a formal assessment at the end of the unit, in which I include two things: At this point, I would expect them to demonstrate mastery.

As they say, keep it simple. When it comes to summarizing nonfiction, remember that answers will vary. I hope these ideas help you and your students.

Tags: acdemic writing Angie Miller authentic audiences boring writing formulaic writing imagery mentor texts nonfiction text precise language. MiddleWeb. MiddleWeb is all about the middle grades, with great resources, book reviews, and guest posts by educators who support the success of young adolescents. Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text. RI Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts. The Teachers College Reading and Writing Project has developed state-of-the-art classroom libraries for each grade level, K–8. we suggest previewing these texts before using them in your classroom in order to ensure that you find materials that are best suited for your particular students. Nonfiction Text Sets. Click here to download the.

I use them at the ninth grade level with all levels: Subscribe to our mailing list to receive ELA inspiration and resources!Ideal for preparing your second-grade students for state writing assessments and meeting new standards, this series offers scaffolded text-based writing practice with essential nonfiction writing forms, such as: Compare and contrast, Sequence, Explanatory, Informative, Cause and effect, and Opinion.

This book provides 24 grade-appropriate nonfiction texts in a wide variety of genres, from informational articles, letters, and biographies to e-mail announcements and how-to guides. Each text (of one page or two pages) focuses on a high-interest topic and has.

RELATED RESOURCE: These summarizing nonfiction text teaching materials will provide you with everything you need to tackle the tips above. I use them at the ninth grade level with all levels: co-taught through enriched, but they would be appropriate for middle school or older high school students who struggle with reading comprehension.

This page suggests ways to teach nonfiction reading comprehension and expository writing through teaching nonfiction text structures. Please refer to Strategy Objectives for Teachers and 12 Comprehension Strategies pages to learn more about teaching nonfiction text features.

Tags: acdemic writing Angie Miller authentic audiences boring writing formulaic writing imagery mentor texts nonfiction text precise language. MiddleWeb.

writing about nonfiction texts with text

MiddleWeb is all about the middle grades, with great resources, book reviews, and guest posts by educators who support the success of young adolescents. Nonfiction Lesson Plan Example with BIG Ideas and BIG Questions ANCHOR READING STANDARDS, BIG IDEAS, AND BIG QUESTIONS FOR NONFICTION TEXTS CCSS Anchor Reading Standard BIG IDEAS ABOUT READING RELATED BIG QUESTIONS 1.

Read closely to determine what the text says Target: preview a nonfiction text and identify relevant.

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